Fresh Coconut Cream Curry

I have learnt the art of making fresh coconut cream and my goodness it tastes absolutely scrumptious!
Have you ever had it from anything but a can?
It’s abit of simple labour but definitely worth it.

For those of you who can get brown coconuts give it a go! you may just want to add the cream to your cuppa, cereal, cooking or guzzle it pure!
The rest of you… Well enjoy in theory!

Find a nice brown coconut or two full of water…

 

To break it in half over a bowl neatly, whack it around its belly with the back of a heavy knife or machete til it cracks and spills.
Now put the juice aside and grate the flesh with a coconut grater into another bowl
See the round pointed blade attached to a board you sit on below…

 

 

Return some liquid to the grated coconut, perhaps strain it. Stir through, it will go white and milky. Magic! Taste it with a mouthful of the flesh, mmm
Set aside again…

 

Now prepare your curry…
I used local onion and garlic and a friends grown ginger, chopped with my 18th birthday chefs knife (from my family in monogrammed leather sheath…)
Softened in My own made ghee! ( clarified butter)
Stirred with a locally made spoon and in the magic black pot

 
Measure out ones spices, I used coriander, cumin and turmeric into another locally made spoon…


I aromatise the ginger onion garlic mix for several minutes with the spices then add diced tofu


Turn off the heat and have some muslin or net curtain or some such at hand to squeeze your nut milk through into the pot… Can be messy but fun or make more dishes and squeeze into another bowl first, let your child help!

 


Looking good yet?
Add chopped veg of choice and adjust liquid and seasoning


Simmer til tender
Serve up with rice and yoghurt, chutneys etc…


Yum!
I’m sure you already know about making curry but I did enjoy describing the photos…
I’ve been thinking a lot about my Swiss grandmas banana chicken curry which I haven’t had since childhood. I thought it was a peculiar mix then, but now I’d like to try it again!

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This magnificent coconut tree keeps on astounding me with the diversity of its uses and by products.
Green nuts with their incredible water, sometimes fizzy like lemonade!
The soft jelly like immature flesh varying through stages to firm oily thick white grate able meat.
Coconut milk, cream and oil
Oil for fuel also
Coconut shell for utensils and vessels
Fronds for shelter, roofing, walls, shade
Leaves for weaving, vessels, mats, hats
Bowls, baskets, toys, decorations,
Etc etc etc
Ever wondered why traditional island dwellers where strong and glowing?

In celebration of plant to plate, slow food, free food, foraging, local made, wholefoods, homemade and happiness!
Peace be with you and your belly

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Waking up to…

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as we travel, sometimes we are blessed with the generosity of people giving their home grown produce to us,

Such as Karen who not only spontaneously hosted us for the night but farewelled us with vibrant greegroans dried mango from her garden!

or at the close of a market Jesse can sometimes be laden with produce, like yesterday at the Rockhampton Market he came back with a bag of luscious herbs…

sometimes we find a neglected fruit tree dripping ripeness to the ground (like the above mandarins)

sometimes it’s fruit trees in a public area, more of a rarity, or overhanging a fence.

We check with the property owners and often come away with an abundance of good food for free.

Foraging has some particular reward that is unique, (I haven’t fully articulated it to satisfaction here)

sure it’s great to save some coins when we live on a small budget, but more than that I appreciate that the fruit will be nourishing someone rather than dropping to the ground rotting, and the sharing of abundance when one has it. The village concept of exchange and generosity.

I love to find community gardens, where often in exchange for some weeding we can harvest some fruit, veg or salad greens, usually organically and lovingly grown, this food has a specialness and connection, as I relate to the scents as we gathered it, the weather at the time, the people we connected with and how the children brought me flowers and herbs, observed nature and learnt about how and where our food comes from.

We all seem to relax in these big green spaces and find some retreat from the stimulation of travelling, communing with plants and critters fills our souls again.

In Bellingen where we have been based the last two years there is a fantastic community garden, actually two now!

Also a program of edible gardens in the town, my favorite stop is by the real eastate agents front yard full of salad greens and herbs!

and we often visit Mullumbimby Community Gardens which has a fantastic Food for All section.

I deeply appreciate the work of the committed folk who keep these places going.

We often joke about our bus roof garden complete with chickens and a milking goat…..